Throwing Out My Smartphone

I will try not to be too self-revealing here, but it is hard when writing. For me, this is the point of writing- to reveal the self that wants to stay hidden for fear of judgement. Writing for me is a way of getting beyond this fear and living a more authentic life.

So, here I go…..

I want to throw away my smartphone. I realize that most would think that doing something like this is nuts or reactionary, but I am beginning to feel like it would be an act of sanity.

Deep down I am starting to feel like this smartphone craze is not good for anyone, but who am I to say?

I realize that having a smartphone makes communicating with people who are not in my immediate proximity easier. I can do business without having to talk to a person on the phone. I can stay connected with family members that I don’t really want to talk with. I can be updated with the various things going on in the world. I can listen to whatever music I want at the push of a button.

There are certainly many conveniences of a smartphone, but there are also many conveniences of a microwave (both of which, and there is much literature online about this, can cause cancer). Doesn’t mean it’s good because it is convenient. My brain just can’t buy into the idea that convenience equals good.

Smartphones take up large chunks of our lives that could be spent doing much more meaningful things. For example, people spend much more time locked away in their bathrooms, on the toilet while also on their smartphones. I don’t think there are any studies on this but I am certain that the vast majority of people these days are spending much more time on a toilet than ever before. Toilet time has become scrolling and texting time. This destroys the Zen idea of doing one thing at a time and keeping a strong and mindful focus on the thing being doing.

Smartphones turn people into habitual multitaskers. Multitasking just means not doing anything well. When our minds are scattered because of all the various things that we need to check or attend to on our smartphones, we lose the ability to be able to do one thing well. We also lose the ability to tend to our lives in the present moment.

I used to be a prolific reader of mainly novels and philosophy texts. I could get through a three-hundred-page book in about a week and get a lot out of that book. Now I feel like it is a continual struggle. My attention is interrupted every ten minutes by this ominous pull to check my smartphone. This makes it harder for me to keep my attention on what I am reading. And reading with no attention is like running with no legs- it just ain’t much fun. So, I don’t finish as many books these days and I am just not comfortable with this.

The idea of trading substance (which, is what I feel like I am cultivating when I read, meditate, draw, write, listen to records, talk with people, etc.…) for the things that I am doing on my smartphone just does not feel like a wise choice. It is a kind of Faustian bargain. As fun as social media may be, all it is doing is turning us into a collective hive that channels or funnels information in the form of updates, tweets, “likes,” “re-posts,” and on and on. We are not doing anything of real substance. I suppose this is why it is appealing- it’s easy and requires very little effort. But it also makes us just like everyone else.

I understand that my smartphone has a very practical use but I find it difficult to keep the practical and the other superficial stuff separate. It is like a drunk hanging out at a bar and only having one beer. Eventually he or she will be drunk again.

It takes a superhero like quality these days to keep oneself from getting completely sucked into their smartphone. They may start out with the idea of using it in a disciplined way, but before long they are on it first thing in the morning and last thing at night. They are sitting with friends and loved ones while on their smartphone. They are not cooking or exercising or meditating or reading as much anymore because they are on their smartphone. They are late to work or appointments because they are on their smartphone. Doing what? It’s mostly fluff. It’s mostly time spent doing nothing of value at all (except perpetuating the hive mind). Even the conversations we have with others through text are devoid of real meaning or substance.

Smartphones are really the greatest distraction humanity has ever seen. It is distraction in its purest from. And we all know how addictive pure distraction can be. Especially when it is in the palm of your hand.

I don’t want to live a shallow life, devoid of any real attention. It does not feel good. I want to do the things that mean something to me and not spend valuable time doing things that do not matter to me but doing them anyways because I can’t interrupt the ominous pull to check my smartphone. I am concerned for those in their twenties and early thirties who are on their smartphone, most of the time. Will they be fifty and look book at their youth and think, “What did I do? I failed to live my youth!” Similar to how a person may now feel who spent most of the 1980’s in front of a TV.

I want to throw out my smartphone. I really don’t want it around anymore. I managed to get rid of my television and that freed up a lot of time to do things that have more substance. It helped to return my attention span to a state of normalcy. But now I have this smartphone to contend with. If I get rid of it, I must return to talking with people on the phone and taking ten minutes to write a three-sentence text.

Seems worth it though. In exchange, I feel like I will get back quality time (and attention) that I cannot help but feel this smartphone is stealing from me.

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